gemstone

  1. Natural Baltic Amber Teething Necklaces

    Natural Baltic Amber Teething Necklaces

    Baltic Amber Teething Necklaces have been part of Old World European folk medicine for centuries, bringing teething babies relief without the use of drugs or harsh ointments.

    It’s the perfect alternative to traditional western medicine for babies and toddlers who are going through the teething process.

    You will notice a difference in their mood and behavior thanks to the Succinic Acid that is naturally contained within the amber. They won’t have to suffer through the side effects of synthetic medicine or deal with scrapings inside their mouths from teething toys.

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  2. Is Amber the New GOLD? How to Test and Identify Amber

    Is Amber the New GOLD? How to Test and Identify Amber

    I love amber because it is so easy for an average person to misidentify it as plastic! Some amber necklaces sell for hundreds and even thousands of dollars so taking the time to learn these simple tests to identify Amber can be valuable information.

    Now there are more advance tests that only a laboratory can do, but honestly unless you come across an extremely rare piece with an insect in it, which would increase its value to thousands of dollars. I personally would not invest the time or money to have advance tests done.

    These tests are more then sufficient to sell confidently on Ebay. Especially since (Most of the time) I'm usually only spending 50 cents or less for my pieces when I buy in bulk.

    Nothing we say is a rule! There are no rules, think outside the box! Be your own boss. We hope that we give you some ideas that will benefit you, or at very least you find our videos entertaining

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  3. Fact or Fiction - The Amber Teething Necklace

    Fact or Fiction - The Amber Teething Necklace

    Both adults and children have worn amber necklaces for centuries. While many still believe that the substance is a mineral or a crystal in actuality Amber is hardened resin, which dropped from the trunks of now-extinct conifers millions of years ago and solidified over time. The gem has been used by humans for roughly 35,000 years, as it was first seen washed up on the shores of land surrounding the Baltic Seas.

    The material was then transported to other parts of Europe via the “Amber Road,” a trade route connecting the coastal areas of the North and South Baltic Seas down to the Mediterranean Sea. The gem was mainly used for its alleged medicinal and metaphysical properties, to alleviate pain, treat various diseases, and rid certain areas of negative energy. Although previous generations have claimed that Amber has effective healing elements, it was only until recently that modern-day scientists proved this theory t

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  4. How can you tell if Amber is real?

    How to Tell If Your Amber Piece Is Real

    As it is with the world, humans always find new ways to try to copy nature. Amber was discovered during the early 18th century when a group of scientists found a way to synthesize it. Natural materials were made into less valuable copies and slowly brought into the market. These pieces were used as jewelry and, naturally, their price was high.

    Nowadays fake Baltic amber has flooded the market, and most people do not even realize it. People intend to purchase these amber pieces and think of them as genuine because they cannot tell the difference. Sadly, many of these people are exploited as merchants who sell fake amber usually do so at a high price.

    Of course, any ordinary person can be deceived and may not be able to tell the difference. However, a person with a good understanding of the healing powers of the stone, as well as its texture and quality, can differentiate fake amber from real amber.

    To ma

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  5. The Value of Amber

    The Value of Amber

    Amber is classified into translucent, transparent, semitransparent, and opaque. Low-transparent amber is called “bastard amber.” A fossilized resin that’s tainted with wood or any organic matter is graded based on its internal structure.

    Jewelers usually prefer clear amber. However, translucent amber can look wooly, with some opaque sections. Assessing the value of amber requires a combination of the following factors: internal structure, outside appearance/quality, its age, and whether or not it contains entombed materials (e.g., bugs, bark, etc.).

    Visible, but rare inclusions of entombed relics in amber can improve its price. Often, the resin is brought for assessment simply because of its inclusions, mainly because they are also proof of its authenticity.

    The milky coloration seen in some amber pieces are a result of air bubbles and can be considered by some jewelers as defective. However, some jewelers make an exception

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  6. Caring for Your Gemstone

    Caring for Your Gemstone

    Amber is a beautiful gem that looks stunning in any setting. To make sure that it stays beautiful it’s essential that you learn how to care for it properly.

    To ensure that your gem continues to shine, make sure to apply a wax that’s silicon-based once every four to six months. This wax can also help prevent your piece from oxidizing.

    Do not use a jewelry machine or steam cleaner when you polish or clean your amber, as these machines can damage your piece. Instead, use a warm water solution with a mild soap. Place the solution into a container and drop the amber into it. Leave it to sit for ten minutes, then remove the amber and dry it with a flannel cloth.

    You can also place a drop of olive oil onto the amber and use a soft cloth to polish it.

    Because amber is a not technically a stone, it is also not as stable as other gems you may own. Due to is being softer than most gemstones, amber should be stored sepa

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  7. About Amber

    About Amber

    Amber has been around for thousands of years. People have used it to decorate palaces and to heal those struggling with physical ailments. Some even believe that the gemstone has magical qualities.

    As we previously mentioned, amber is made-up of resin, which dropped to the ground and hardened through polymerization millions of years ago.

    Amber that has not yet fully hardened is called “Copal.” You can differentiate Copal from Amber, due to the substance still being relatively soft.

    Most of the world’s amber comes from the Baltic Sea. Baltic amber contains 98 percent succinite, which is said to provide health benefits.

    Amber also comes in different colors other than the yellow. Opaque amber can have a creamy or foamy look. It looks beautiful if you place it in a silver setting, and is a variation of

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  8. The Healing Properties of Amber

    The Healing Properties of Amber

    Perhaps you’ve seen the first ‘Jurassic Park’ movie and have always wondered which stone that was. The stone that holds the mosquito intact from which the scientists extract a bit of DNA to replicate dinosaur genes so on and so forth. Well, that stone was a fossilized tree resin known as amber.

    With immense historical significance, amber has been used for thousands of years. The oldest pieces of amber that have been found date back to 8000 BC.

    The Latin name for amber is ‘Electrum’, and is famous for containing electrical properties along with a magnificent color. People sometimes refer to it as ‘Liquid Sunshine’ because of the natural mixture of yellow and orange that make it look like the color of sunshine.

    In essence, amber has been used as a means to dissipate negative energy. Its healing properties have baffled many scientists and researchers and there are no scientific reasons shedding light on the stone’

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  9. Where Does Amber Come From?

    Where Does Amber Come From?

    Amber’s coloring and other-worldly quality often have people questioning where the stone is derived from and whether or not it should be categorized as a crystal, a mineral, or a fossilized rock. The truth of the matter is that the stone has very interesting origins that can be traced back centuries. While most vendors who sell amber gemstones choose to focus on its known healing properties, the stone itself has a far more interesting story.

    What is Amber?

    The short answer is that amber is a fossilized derivative of extinct trees. The long answer is that the resin found in those now-extinct trees is thought to have functioned in a similar fashion to the resin residing in conifers. This means that the resin would have acted as a sealant by coursing down and through the limbs and trunk

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